In Mexico City, the braintrust for the expansion of Major League Baseball met to come to a final conclusion as to who the 4 new MLB expansion teams would be. One was a given... the Kansas City Royals. The other 3 however provided some serious consideration. San Diego announced that if they were to be given a new Major League franchise that they would have their stadium ready in time for opening day 1969, and the team would not need to temporarily play at Westgate . Though not one of William A. Shea's initial considerations, San Diego was awarded a franchise. Seattle was oddly enough awarded a franchise as well... perhaps the biggest failure of the meeting as the Pilots would barely last a single year at Sicks Stadium before fleeing to Milwaukee. In came Montreal's city councilman Gerry Snyder to the meetings raving about how Montreal was a world class city just primed for baseball. Being the "American Language" ambassador so to speak for Canada, and councilman to the "American language" side of town, Snyder tried to persuade the group that baseball could thrive tremendously by opening itself to international play and to allow Montreal the opportunity to be the inaugural team in this endeavor. On the panel was the man with perhaps the biggest reputation in professional baseball and probably the greatest amount of persuasion... Los Angeles Dodgers president Walter O'Malley.