During this time, the Kansas City Blues were starting to become hot again as well. Jimmy Zinn would go 23-13 (3.48) in 1928 for his 3rd 20 win season and his last with the Blues, as K.C. came in 4th. In 1929 Tom Angley would bat .389 in 208 at bats and Ollie Tucker would hit 20 homers and bat .336 while Harry Riconda (.320), John Peters (.320),. Joe Kuhel (27 2B, 26 3B, .325), Bob Seeds (.342) and Denver Grigsby (.345) became the most terrifying lineup in the American Association. Together this team managed to just miss tying the all time wins record for this stadium, going 111-56 on the year... the 2nd best any team would ever do here, for their 2nd championship at Muehlebach Stadium. While it would be awhile before the Blues got back to the playoffs, there were very special seasons for a couple of Blues players including Gus Dugas who at the age of only 24, batted .419 (327 At Bats). Eddie Pick meanwhile would hit a boatload of doubles knocking 58 of them in 1931. Pick would come back to hit .344 the following season. The Columbus Senators meanwhile had done something very special in 1932. They signed a deal with the St. Louis Cardinals to be their proprietary minor league team to feed them players throughout the year. It was the beginning of affiliated ball in the American Association. Though Columbus would be the only team to hold an affiliation for the first three years of this "test", by 1935, every team had an affiliate including the Blues.