Photograph Bob Gaver

Young catcher Johnny Bench was back and though he batted only .259, he still led the team in home runs (23) and in RBIs (68). Future major leaguer Hal McRae batted .251 and hit 10 home runs. Duke Carmel had 12 home runs, but batted an anemic .167. Righthander Ernie Broglio, who had figured in one of the most one-sided trades in baseball history (Broglio, Bobby Shantz and Doug Clemons from the Cardinals to the Cubs for Lou Brock, Jack Spring and Paul Toth), was the only pitcher with double-digit wins (12-13). Before the season had even finished, President Bob Howsam of the Reds informed the Bisons that the working agreement was terminated. Said Howsam: "War Memorial Stadium is no place to develop young ballplayers." Joe Alli, writing in the Courier-Express, summarized the bleak outlook: "Thus ends one of the darkest seasons ever for Buffalo baseball. No working agreement, no suitable place to play and precious little money." * Buffalo Bisons. 1967 record: 64-76 (.453), 7th place.