With Rube Marquard's promotion to the Major Leagues, the Indians came back down to earth. Charlie Carr returned to hit 37 2B and bat .279 only to have Jack Hayden return and best his doubles record with 39 to take the club lead, but the Indians fell to 2 games under .500. This began another downward spiral. The Indians tried to clean house in 1910, but that led to 96 losses. The team lost so much ground that it was easy to overlook that Joe McCarthy (.268) was on the 1911 team. McCarthy
would of course become one of the great managers for the 1930's-1940's Yankees, leading the team to 7 World Series titles in his 16 years as Yankee Manager. McCarthy would also manage the Cubs and Red Sox and spent 24 years as a skipper before being inducted into the Major League Baseball Hall of Fame @ Cooperstown in 1957. By 1912, the Indianapolis Indians had hit rock bottom. In fact they were so dreadful, that their 111 losses stands today … out of the 151 teams that have called Indianapolis home… as the worst professional ballclub to ever take the field in the city of Indianapolis. Otto Merz led the league in futility putting up an incredibly bad 9-25 record. Louis LeRoy (11-20) helped to lead the Indians to yet another forgettable 99 loss season in 1913. If all this wasn't bad enough… the Indians were also fighting a new foe… the Federal League. A brand new baseball league sprung up in Indianapolis and unlike the American Association, the Federal League was competing on a Major League level. The new Indianapolis Hoosiers were playing at Federal League Park and unlike the Indians… they had a terrific team. In fact, by 1914… they were the Federal League Champions. With excellent hitting and terrific pitching, they were the anti-Indians. The Indians had to step up and by 1914, they did…